Menu
long-arrow.svg
MenuPreviousNext
1 of 4
Subscribe to our newsletter
2 of 4
 
 
3 of 4
 
 
4 of 4
 
 
Use the sliders to select your approximate budget per person
 
£8000 - £25000+
 
 
 
Submit enquiry
Thanks
MenuPreviousNext
1 of 2
Subscribe to our newsletter
2 of 2
 
 
Let us know your approximate budget per person
 
£8000 - £25000+
 
 
 
Submit enquiry
Thanks
Please select
Travelled before
Recommended by a friend
Online Search
Social Media
Publication/magazine
Travel show
Event
Other
MenuPreviousNext
1 of 2
2 of 2
 
 
Submit enquiry
Thanks
Menu
Subscribe
Thanks
Menu
Click here to upload your brief
Submit brief
Menu Positive Impact of Travel on Endangered Species
SEEKING INSPIRATION?
Thank You for Subscribing
Exclusive safaris are our speciality.
Sign up to receive the latest news and the inside stories of amazing places and how best to experience them.
Our welcome email will arrive in your inbox shortly.
callback-iconWould you like a callback? close-callback
Menu Positive Impact of Travel on Endangered Species
Let us call you
Thank you for your enquiry
Africa is a continent of such scale, diversity and richness that it offers limitless travel combinations. The best way to start your journey is to speak to our team of expert safari designers.

Our offices are now closed but please leave your details below for a callback.
One of our safari designers will be in touch at your suggested time. We look forward to speaking with you.
MenuSearchicon
1-866-871-3829
Contact Us
Contact Us
1-866-871-3829
slider-spacerslider-spacer
 

Positive Impact of Travel on Endangered Species

 
We have been exploring Africa’s wild places for 30 years, yet we are still as awe-struck by the majestic beauty of its iconic wildlife as we were during our first encounters. With so many of these species endangered, we ensure conservation is at the heart of every exceptional safari we arrange.

We shall never forget our first sighting of a rhino surrounded by the pristine wilderness of Botswana’s Okavango Delta, that heart stopping encounter sitting among a pack of wild dog in Laikipia or the first flash of a leopard tail as it leaps from an acacia. As we approach the end of our second full week following the UK’s social distancing measures, we have good news to inspire you to continue dreaming of your next adventure.
 
We felt such joy when we heard that mountain gorilla numbers had once again reached over 1,000. Residing in well-protected safe havens in the misty mountain rainforests of Uganda and Rwanda, it is one of the most direct positive effects of conservation tourism. When you purchase a gorilla tracking permit, giving you the chance to spend an unforgettable hour with these great apes, you are directly increasing the species’ chance of survival, contributing to the cost of park rangers and veterinary care.

If you want to take a closer look at this initiative in action, it is also now possible to join researchers working to habituate new gorilla families. Over the course of a few hours spent deep within the rainforest, you will learn how researchers help acclimate families to the presence of humans, through a gentle, long term visitation process.
 
Across Africa, efforts to relocate black and white rhino to safer regions has seen numbers in Tanzania rise by 10%, while in northern Botswana, a population of almost 90 now thrives. Kenya is also turning the tide, following a dramatic decline in black rhino populations from 1960-1980, when numbers plummeted from 20,000 to less than 300. Global anti-poaching initiatives were spurred into action to save these horned pachyderms and populations are steadily increasing.

One example of this is the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy which worked with partners to push the boundaries of conservation, setting aside a large tract of land to create a rhino sanctuary. A recent collaboration with the Borana Conservancy now extends this sanctuary to an astonishing 93,000 acres which is home to 14% of Kenya’s black rhino population.
 
Namibia is integral to the survival of Africa’s most endangered big cat, the cheetah. It is estimated that there are now fewer than 10,000 cheetah left in the wild and over half of this population call Namibia home. It is therefore imperative that feline conservation groups such as AfriCat and the Cheetah Conservation Fund exist there, conducting research, rehabilitating injured or orphaned cats, and mitigating human-wildlife conflict.

The work of AfriCat also looks after Namibia’s dwindling lion, leopard and hyena populations. If cheetah are top of your list to see, it may interest you to know that some of our team’s top places to see them are Okonjima in Namibia, Namiri Plains in Tanzania, and Botswana’s Linyanti region.
 
In the southwest corner of Lake Victoria, Rubondo Island is cloaked in rich forests and dazzling ecosystems. In the 1960s the Frankfurt Zoological Society released 17 chimpanzee into the wild on the island, all of whom had been rescued from captivity. In their secure island habitat, protected from predators and with an ample food supply, they quickly reverted to their unhabituated state. In the intervening years, the chimpanzee population has steadily grown and is thriving.

It is now possible for you to contribute to their ongoing protection by visiting them in their island home, the Rubondo Island National Park. Although the chimps will no doubt be the focus of your visit to the island, they are by no means the only draw. There are 300 recorded bird species in the national park, two thirds of which is completely untouched creating a natural Eden for you to explore by vehicle, on foot and by boat.
Trustpilot