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Where to track rhino

 
A sighting of any one of the Big Five is a cause for great excitement. But spotting a rhino in the wild? It is one of those things that dreams are made of. At around a tonne in weight, and generally considered to be the second largest land mammal, they shouldn’t be hard to see, but poaching has devastated population numbers. Park authorities have to be very cautious with any information they share about rhino numbers and regarding their whereabouts. An encounter, therefore, truly is a privilege.
 
A spectacular choice for rhino spotting - where a rhino encounter is pretty much guaranteed - is the aptly named Saruni Rhino in Kenya. The camp, which opened in 2017, has just three luxury bandas (cottage-style tents) and is the first in East Africa to offer a rhino tracking experience. Not only will you be able to get wonderfully close to the rhino, but your stay also helps fund the vital rhino conservation programme.

Saruni Rhino is deep within Samburu National Reserve. The Sera Rhino Conservancy protects a dozen endangered black rhino, the majority of which were translocated here from other areas where they were particularly under threat. On your guided rhino walks you will be accompanied by a highly trained Sera Community Conservancy Ranger, who will keep you safe and at the same time teach you about the rhino and their habits.
 
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The Gomoti Plains Camp in Botswana’s Okavango Delta has also been a beneficiary of rhino translocation programmes, thanks to the important work of Rhinos Without Borders. 33 white rhino were brought from South Africa to Gomoti Plains in 2017, and they have now comfortably settled into their new home.

Due to the high amount of water in the Delta, the vegetation in Gomoti Plains is lush. This gives the rhino plenty of places to hide. Unlike in the savannah where you can see the bulky form of a rhino from miles away, here you can come around a corner and suddenly be right on top of one! The anticipation builds during every bush walk and game drive - you’ll never forget your first encounter.
 
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South Africa’s Kruger National Park has substantial populations of all the Big Five mammals, but for exclusivity, the private conservancies which border it tend to be less crowded with people. Camp Jabulani, a Relais & Chateaux lodge on the Kapama Private Game Reserve, is a fantastic choice for families, including those with younger children. Not only can you visit the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre, one of the most important places for rhino breeding in South Africa, but you can also have an immersive elephant experience with Camp Jabulani’s local herds.
 
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Last but certainly not least, in Namibia you can track rhino at Andersson’s Camp. Suggesting Namibia as a wildlife watching destination, might raise an eyebrow, but there are some extraordinary desert adapted species here, and the wildernesses are unspoilt.

Andersson’s Camp is a scientific and conservation centre first and foremost. There is some gorgeous guest accommodation - seven guest lodges and one family lodge - and it’s a wonderful place to relax, but the real thrill is getting involved with the camp’s important research work. Here, you will meet conservationists, visit their research stations, and get to know the rhino security personnel. It is an extraordinary learning experience as you get the inside view of what is involved in protecting this remarkable species for the future.
 
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As you will see from this blog, there are multiple ways to encounter rhino in the wild. The experience which is right for you will depend on your choice of destination, style of travel, and the extent you want to immerse yourself in conservation work. If seeing these incredible animals in the wild is on your bucket list, get in touch with a member of our safari design team by calling us on 01604 628979.
 
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